DR. MANNING MARABLE TO LEAD CITY-WIDE CONVERSATION ON "RESISTANCE AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: THE ONGOING FIGHT FOR FREEDOM"

03/13/2007
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Event at the DuSable Museum of
African American History
will begin
with free tour of exhibition,
"381 Days: The Montgomery
Bus Boycott Story," followed by
conversation with Dr. Marable

CHICAGO – On Saturday, April 7, from 1:30 - 4:00 p.m., the Public Square at the Illinois Humanities Council and the DuSable Museum of African American History invite you on a free tour of "381 Days: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story," at DuSable Museum of African American History (740 East 56th Place, Chicago).

Following the tour, Dr. Manning Marable, one of America's most influential and widely-read scholars, willexplore the history of the civil rights era and its lessons for current movements struggling for equality. Marable is a Professor of Public Affairs, Political Science, and History at Columbia University in New York City. Most recently, he wrote Living Black History: How Reimagining the African-American Past Can Remake America's Racial Future, a fresh look at the legacy of well-known figures of the Civil Rights Movement.In addition, Marable authors a political commentary series, Along the Color Line, and is the creator of the Malcolm X Biography Project. For more information on Marable, view his biography at manningmarble.net.

Following the presentation, attendees will participate in small, facilitated discussions to share reflections on the exhibition and presentation and will explore the history and future of social justice organizing.

This program is free and open to the public. Reservations are recommended and can be made at events@thepublicsquare.org or 312.422.5580.

This program is co-sponsored by: The DuSable Museum of African American History; African and Black Diaspora Studies-DePaul University; Mansfield Institute for Social Justice-Roosevelt University; Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture-University of Chicago; Urban Studies Program-Associated Colleges of the Midwest; Center for African American History-Northwestern University; and the Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media-Columbia College.

ABOUT CAFÉ SOCIETY

The Café Society project began in October 2002 at four area coffee shops and has since expanded to eight sites, including one downstate in Carbondale, Illinois. This project fosters a more robust civil society, more cohesive and interactive communities, greater media literacy and a more informed and engaged citizenry through weekly coffee shop conversations about contemporary social issues. Current media reports (along with ample doses of caffeine) serve as stimulants for the conversations. The idea is to cross boundaries of class, race, ideology, and background to facilitate meaningful discussions about the underlying historical and philosophical issues implicated in topics in the news. The Café Society project taps the growing coffee culture in Chicago as a vehicle to promote conversations between strangers (a cornerstone of democratic practice) about relevant social issues, with a focus on the theme of citizenship -- broadly defined -- and critically examined.

ABOUT THE PUBLIC SQUARE AT THE ILLINOIS HUMANITIES COUNCIL

The Public Square at the IHC fosters debate, dialogue, and exchange of ideas about cultural, social and political issues with an emphasis on social justice. Programs promote participatory democracy by creating space for public conversations. Knowledge is power, yet much crucial knowledge still circulates only in small, isolated communities. We build bridges between theory and practice in order to empower individuals to use ideas as tools to improve their lives.More information about The Public Square at the IHC and Café Society is available at www.thepublicsquare.org.

The Illinois Humanities Council is an educational organization dedicated to fostering a culture in which the humanities are a vital part of the lives of individuals and communities. Through its programs and grants, the IHC promotes greater understanding of, appreciation for, and involvement in the humanities by all Illinoisans, regardless of their economic resources, cultural background, or geographic location. Organized as a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1973, the IHC is now a private nonprofit (501 [c] 3) organization that is funded by contributions from individuals, corporations, and foundations; by the Illinois General Assembly; and by the NEH.

D A R E T O K N O W
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